And The Families?

And the Families?   

 

 

 

   
 
Aaron Levy, Senior Administrator at Ezer Mizion: “The life of a sick child’s family comes to a standstill. We have to try and enable them to keep up their daily routine in spite of the sickness.”

“A sick child’s family members suffer along with him. Together with the patient, they face a daily struggle. Just as we care for the patient himself, we have to be sure not to forget his family. They need to be given a suitable response for all their needs,” so says Rabbi Aharon Levi, a member of Ezer Mizion’s directorate.

Ezer Mizion has expanded its special projects that provide assistance not only for the patients themselves, but also for their parents, siblings and other family members.

Ezer Mizion volunteers, as well as social workers who are in close contact with the patients’ families, have rallied to provide for a real need for assistance that remains to be met.

In response to this need, Ezer Mizion has expanded its unique support group for parents of children with cancer. The group is geared to helping parents cope with their child’s serious illness as well as with the emotional stress that it brings. The parents meet once every three weeks. In the group, they have a chance to release feelings, speak about what they are going through, and provide and receive support in the group structure. There are separate groups for mothers and for fathers.

In addition to the support groups, Ezer Mizion operates a “Big brother/big sister” mentor program for siblings of sick children. These specially trained mentors provide help with schoolwork along with emotional support and fun activities. They are supervised by the project’s social workers and psychologist.

Ezer Mizion also operates a game lending library, offering games and other items to help occupy the sick children and lift their spirits, in spite of their medical situation.

“The lives of the siblings, parents and relatives of a child with cancer change drastically and at times even come to a standstill. It seems impossible to keep up a normative daily routine when a sibling or child is undergoing painful treatments and going through a difficult medical situation,” says Levy. “We, on our part, try to do everything possible to help parents and the rest of the family cope and maintain a normal daily routine, despite the pain and uncertainty.”

These type of activities are part of the scene in many of Ezer Mizion’s departments, and are not limited to families of children with cancer. Activities are also done for families of children who are handicapped, autistic or Down’s Syndrome. Just recently, a fun day was coordinated at Ezer Mizion for siblings of special needs children, including developmentally delayed, autistic and Down’s Syndrome children. The goal of the fun day was to provide positive attention to children who may suffer from a lack of such attention because of their siblings’ impairment. The children enjoyed many exhilarating activities, and also were given talks that helped them understand their sibling’s handicap.

“The family members’ challenge is a difficult one. We feel a need to do everything we can for them. If one child in a family is suffering, it is echoed in the home and the rest of his family must be helped with coping tools and strategies, massive emotional support and attention for the siblings that every child needs and deserves.”

 

 

For further information: http://www.ezermizion.org

 

 

 

 

   
 
Aaron Levy, Senior Administrator at Ezer Mizion: “The life of a sick child’s family comes to a standstill. We have to try and enable them to keep up their daily routine in spite of the sickness.”

“A sick child’s family members suffer along with him. Together with the patient, they face a daily struggle. Just as we care for the patient himself, we have to be sure not to forget his family. They need to be given a suitable response for all their needs,” so says Rabbi Aharon Levi, a member of Ezer Mizion’s directorate.

Ezer Mizion has expanded its special projects that provide assistance not only for the patients themselves, but also for their parents, siblings and other family members.

Ezer Mizion volunteers, as well as social workers who are in close contact with the patients’ families, have rallied to provide for a real need for assistance that remains to be met.

In response to this need, Ezer Mizion has expanded its unique support group for parents of children with cancer. The group is geared to helping parents cope with their child’s serious illness as well as with the emotional stress that it brings. The parents meet once every three weeks. In the group, they have a chance to release feelings, speak about what they are going through, and provide and receive support in the group structure. There are separate groups for mothers and for fathers.

In addition to the support groups, Ezer Mizion operates a “Big brother/big sister” mentor program for siblings of sick children. These specially trained mentors provide help with schoolwork along with emotional support and fun activities. They are supervised by the project’s social workers and psychologist.

Ezer Mizion also operates a game lending library, offering games and other items to help occupy the sick children and lift their spirits, in spite of their medical situation.

“The lives of the siblings, parents and relatives of a child with cancer change drastically and at times even come to a standstill. It seems impossible to keep up a normative daily routine when a sibling or child is undergoing painful treatments and going through a difficult medical situation,” says Levy. “We, on our part, try to do everything possible to help parents and the rest of the family cope and maintain a normal daily routine, despite the pain and uncertainty.”

These type of activities are part of the scene in many of Ezer Mizion’s departments, and are not limited to families of children with cancer. Activities are also done for families of children who are handicapped, autistic or Down’s Syndrome. Just recently, a fun day was coordinated at Ezer Mizion for siblings of special needs children, including developmentally delayed, autistic and Down’s Syndrome children. The goal of the fun day was to provide positive attention to children who may suffer from a lack of such attention because of their siblings’ impairment. The children enjoyed many exhilarating activities, and also were given talks that helped them understand their sibling’s handicap.

“The family members’ challenge is a difficult one. We feel a need to do everything we can for them. If one child in a family is suffering, it is echoed in the home and the rest of his family must be helped with coping tools and strategies, massive emotional support and attention for the siblings that every child needs and deserves.”

 

 

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